The Daily Cephalopost

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fancyadance:

Mary O’ Malley Ceramics

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(via sea-birds)

— 2 weeks ago with 43931 notes
archiemcphee:

This tentacular little cutie might just be a brand new species of octopus. He’s one of 11 potentially new species discovered in July 2010 during a deep-sea expedition conducted by a team of Canadian and Spanish researchers. The team used a remotely operated vehicle (called ROPOS) in the waters off Newfoundland on Canada’s Atlantic coast, working at a maximum depth of about 9,800 feet (3,000 meters).

The 20-day expedition aims to uncover relationships between cold-water coral and other bottom-dwelling creatures in a pristine yet “alien” environment, according to the researchers’ blog. “It’s been really spectacular,” Ellen Kenchington, research scientist with the Fisheries Department of Canada—one of the organizations involved in the project—told Canada’s CTV News website. “It’s really changing our perception of the diversity that’s out there. … We’re seeing new species in deeper waters.”

How exciting! So, if this purple cephalopod does turn out to be a previously unknown species, what would you name him?
Photograph courtesy of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography
[via National Geographic]

archiemcphee:

This tentacular little cutie might just be a brand new species of octopus. He’s one of 11 potentially new species discovered in July 2010 during a deep-sea expedition conducted by a team of Canadian and Spanish researchers. The team used a remotely operated vehicle (called ROPOS) in the waters off Newfoundland on Canada’s Atlantic coast, working at a maximum depth of about 9,800 feet (3,000 meters).

The 20-day expedition aims to uncover relationships between cold-water coral and other bottom-dwelling creatures in a pristine yet “alien” environment, according to the researchers’ blog. “It’s been really spectacular,” Ellen Kenchington, research scientist with the Fisheries Department of Canada—one of the organizations involved in the project—told Canada’s CTV News website. “It’s really changing our perception of the diversity that’s out there. … We’re seeing new species in deeper waters.”

How exciting! So, if this purple cephalopod does turn out to be a previously unknown species, what would you name him?

Photograph courtesy of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography

[via National Geographic]

(via dofistandroidgirls)

— 2 weeks ago with 653 notes

blueandbluer:

ridingaroundwithmayoinmyhair:

underthevastblueseas:

A female Blanket Octopus might get to about a meter or 2 (3.3 to 6.6 feet) in length, but her first 2 pairs of legs are extra specially long. Attached to them is a huge span of webbing that is normally hidden away.In times of need, this drapery is unfurled, spread out and left to billow in the water. This makes her look far larger and more threatening than she actually is, hopefully scaring off any predators. If it doesn’t seem to be working so well, bits of her blanket can even detach from the rest to act as a decoy.

Blanket Octopus are immune to the stings of the Portuguese Man o’ War. They can rip off a few of the Man o’ War’s tentacles and wield them like whips. Poisonous, stinging whips.

source

WHATTTTTTTTTT. WHAT

Cephalopods for the fuckin’ win.

— 3 weeks ago with 16788 notes
fyeahoctopodes:

Amphioctopus marginatus, or Coconut Octopus.

fyeahoctopodes:

Amphioctopus marginatus, or Coconut Octopus.

(Source: flickr.com, via connerjay)

— 1 month ago with 72 notes

tentacular-art:

These hand knit octopuses were made by Leah Coccari-Swift. I couldn’t decide which I liked better so I’m just posting them both. She has more in her shop if you want to check them out.

http://www.etsy.com/shop/RubySubmarine

(via monkeyelfknits)

— 1 month ago with 116 notes